NGA Sculpture Garden - Canberra - Review

There’s nothing better than to walk in the fresh air and admire sculptures in the NGA Sculpture Garden. First created in 1981 by Harry Howard & Associates and James Mollison the first Gallery Director, it was designed to compliment the building with the diagonal of the main pathway and the floor plan of the garden matching that of the National Gallery of Australia (NGA) main building. 

Clement Meadiore’s Virginia - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Clement Meadiore’s Virginia - Photo credit: @busycitykids

The grounds lie between the NGA and the shores of Lake Burley Griffin and comprises of 26 carefully selected sculptures made by International and Australian artists with recent sculptures including Antony Gormley’s Angel of the North facing Lake Burley Griffin and the Fog Sculpture by Fujiko Nakaya so bring the kids to the Fog Sculpture between 12:30pm and 2pm daily. 

Antony Gormley’s Angel of the North - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Antony Gormley’s Angel of the North - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Bert Flugelman’s impressive Cones in polished stainless steel is by far my favourite sculpture in the garden along with Clement Meadiore’s Virginia 'twist' as we call it.

Bert Flugelman’s Cones - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Bert Flugelman’s Cones - Photo credit: @busycitykids

I do have a bias love for French sculptors (being French and all) so I was naturally in love with Emile Antoine Bourdelle’s Penelope, Gaston Lachaise’s Floating Figure and of course Aristide Maillol's La Montagne and Auguste Rodin's Nude study for Jean d'Aire and so was little Miss albeit a few questions ha!

Gaston Lachaise’s Floating Figure - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Gaston Lachaise’s Floating Figure - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Emile Antoine Bourdelle’s Penelope - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Emile Antoine Bourdelle’s Penelope - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Aristide Maillol's La Montagne and Auguste Rodin's Nude study for Jean d'Aire - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Aristide Maillol's La Montagne and Auguste Rodin's Nude study for Jean d'Aire - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Little Miss and her brother loved wondering through the NGA Sculpture Garden. It was nice and fresh that day but we still enjoyed looking at the different sculptures. Just be mindful of the large pond area and little hills that might not be suitable for little children. Little Mister was very intrigued by Dadang Christanto’s Heads in the Water. It is a very strange sculpture set and apparently very creepy when the Fog sculpture is on. 

Dadang Christanto’s Heads in the Water - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Dadang Christanto’s Heads in the Water - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Kids can also have a play in the NGA Play kids area and checkout the Reko Rennie's installation - see our review here.

NGA Play Reko Rennie - Photo credit: @busycitykids

NGA Play Reko Rennie - Photo credit: @busycitykids

Entry is FREE to the NGA Sculpture Garden and most exhibitions at the NGA. There are parents rooms in the building as well as toilets and a café. You can access the NGA Sculpture Garden from outside or through the back of the building. There is reasonable parking nearby the building or under the NGA building and the area and the NGA are pram friendly.

To make the most of your visit, head to the NGA front desk and collect information on what’s on at the NGA.