LightTime at Scienceworks - Melbourne - Review

These winter holidays, immerse the kids with light at the LightTime exhibition at Scienceworks. Eleven experimental artists have created an immersive experience with aesthetic and dramatic optical illusions.

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

Kate took her little explorers to the opening of LightTime last week and liked the combination of art and science brought to Scienceworks. 

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

Enter the Infinity Room by Kit Webster and be prepared to lose any sense of where you are. A mosaic of mirrors, digital display and directional sounds will challenge visitors’ sense of space, giving the sensation of endless light and sound in a world without perceptible boundaries. 

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

Enjoy the glowing colours in the mechatronic flowers of Epiphany’s Genesis by Skunk Control as they are reminiscent of butterfly wings, insect exoskeletons and opals. The beauty of the works is a function of birefringence, the optical property that changes the way we see light depending on angle. 

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

Look through the aberration telescope by Daniel Armstrong inside this simulation and experience the night sky. Using beautiful projections that combine photography and astronomy, this work creates the sensation of star-gazing inside the confines of the museum. 

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

Look into the pool of light and see hundreds of magnifying lenses at the Light Pool installation by Lienors Torre and Rose Woodcock which explores the remarkable capacity of light to be two things at once – both the source of illumination and what is held within an object as refection. 

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

Other works include the Lost Room by Lienors Torre For the Being of Time by Leslie Eastman and Blue: Red by Darrin Verhagen all promising optical-kinetic forms, power of light and sound to cause bodily sensations. Visitors can use hand motion to experience physical responses with two options – blue headphones for the visceral experience and red headphones for analysis of what is happening. 

Lattice from Josh Batty and Mitchell Nordinei is also on display where you will see a massive lattice of 300 square metres encompassing 10 holographic images floating above the viewers’ heads. The work is generated in the space with no repetition or recording, so an original piece of music and light display will be created every day. 

 Photo credit: @kateflatman

Photo credit: @kateflatman

Kate's little ones had a good wonder around, enjoyed the lights and sounds at LightTime at Scienceworks especially the beautiful flowers by Skunk Control. They did find the space dark in parts and perhaps kids 4+ years will enjoy this experimental exhibition further. You can take your pram with you as the exhibition is quite spacious.

For more information on LightTime at Sciencework, head to their website

For more July School Holidays ideas, head to our Holiday Guide.

To follow Kate and her poppets' adventures around Melbourne, head to her Instagram page.

For more ideas on what to do with the little ones, head to our blog or CBD Top 5 FREE activities or our popular Daily Spots List.